Meeting new people and starting new collaborations is one of the most exciting things I can think of, and these folks are no exception. I’ve recently been collaborating with the Collective Quarterly, a new publication started by the talented designer Jesse Lenz in collaboration with Seth Putnam and Jay Gullion. So looking forward to what comes out of this meeting of the minds. Be on the look out for it! Here’s a bit about it:
It follows select artists and artisans on a trip to the unseen hideaways that inspire them to craft uncommon goods. The camera lens brings into focus an often blurry creative process as they work alongside each other to discover truth, surprise and an aesthetic that delights. In these pages, you’ll find a carefully edited selection of dry goods, art, music, food, drink and stories, all deeply rooted in the heritage and land around us. 
This journey hinges on a communion of likeminded creators. We are illustrators, photographers and writers.
 We are shirt-makers, boot-crafters and denim-cutters. We are bartenders, chefs and musicians.

Meeting new people and starting new collaborations is one of the most exciting things I can think of, and these folks are no exception. I’ve recently been collaborating with the Collective Quarterly, a new publication started by the talented designer Jesse Lenz in collaboration with Seth Putnam and Jay Gullion. So looking forward to what comes out of this meeting of the minds. Be on the look out for it! Here’s a bit about it:

It follows select artists and artisans on a trip to the unseen hideaways that inspire them to craft uncommon goods. The camera lens brings into focus an often blurry creative process as they work alongside each other to discover truth, surprise and an aesthetic that delights. In these pages, you’ll find a carefully edited selection of dry goods, art, music, food, drink and stories, all deeply rooted in the heritage and land around us. 

This journey hinges on a communion of likeminded creators. We are illustrators, photographers and writers.
 We are shirt-makers, boot-crafters and denim-cutters. We are bartenders, chefs and musicians.

Help!

This is the saddest!!! help these owls out. 

image

Cabin-Time superfriends Breathe Owl Breathe got their tour van and all of their instruments stolen and pillaged while on tour on west coast America. While the van was recovered, it was totaled, and left an empty shell. All of their instruments, gear, computers, and clothes are at large in the Bay Area.

Please consider donating to help get them home to mighty Michigan.

DONATE

(Source: cabintime)

Returning from an incredible month on Rabbit Island dipping into the numbing waters of Lake Superior and I feel so exhausted and excited and inspired and beat and thrilled to have been witness to this incredible project. The next few months will Bring with them bits and peeks of the arm filling project I am pursuing about this island. The excitement of it all will make it increasingly difficult to keep it a secret to keep an eye out. In addition I also have several new collaborations in the works that I cannot wait to share. New season, new projects, new pens to new paper, new friends, new inspirations, new with every sunrise. Can’t wait for every second of it.

Returning from an incredible month on Rabbit Island dipping into the numbing waters of Lake Superior and I feel so exhausted and excited and inspired and beat and thrilled to have been witness to this incredible project. The next few months will Bring with them bits and peeks of the arm filling project I am pursuing about this island. The excitement of it all will make it increasingly difficult to keep it a secret to keep an eye out. In addition I also have several new collaborations in the works that I cannot wait to share. New season, new projects, new pens to new paper, new friends, new inspirations, new with every sunrise. Can’t wait for every second of it.

(Source: headduenorth)

Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.
Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project: 

         Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through.  During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

        Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

        In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

        There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

        The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.

Here are a few photos from the residency I am currently on with my cousin, collaborator, and brilliant conservation biologist Eva Dwyer. For more check the instagram @lucyengelman & @evadwyer & @rabbitisland. And last but not least, here’s a bit about us and our project:

Along with being collaborators, we are cousins from different sides of the country with very different strengths and a mutual passion for exploring and responding to the environments we have the chance to walk, swim, and climb through. During our stay on Rabbit Island, we hope to create a cohesive collaboration between science and art through the conservation efforts of creating guides and similar documentation of evidence of the islands carefully observed landscapes and its inhabitants.

Our project consists of many different aspects that will organically influence each other, much like our collaboration as scientist and artist. While on the island, we plan to identify birds and fish first and foremost and document their nesting habits, territorial traits, as well as any other identifying factors that present themselves. If the timeline allows, we hope to identify various elements of the vegetation as well including native plants, fungi, and trees.

In addition, after this fieldwork is complete and we have walked the 1.81 circumference of the island (overgrowth permitting), I plan to fabricate an illustrated map of the island to be included in the guide.

There will also potentially be several culinary residents on the island at the same time. The idea of additionally documenting edible plants of the island for the guide appeals to me as well and will add another element of collaboration, science - art - food.

The majority of this fabrication will take place in the following months so the project will be complete for the Devos Museum exhibition in the fall. Our main goal on the island is to do as much site specific data gathering as possible so we can collect a generous index of visual and sensory references to ultimately create a finished guide and map. My hope is that in creating this guide and map that blends together the artistic interpretation of illustration with the meticulous evidence of science, Rabbit Island can serve as an example of promoting conservation through collaborative understanding and representation of place.

Hi all! I haven’t posted in ages because I’m currently the artist in residence on an island on Lake Superior making a giant field guide project for three weeks. So if you’re still interested in seeing what I’m up to, follow me on instagram @lucyengelman

Hi all! I haven’t posted in ages because I’m currently the artist in residence on an island on Lake Superior making a giant field guide project for three weeks. So if you’re still interested in seeing what I’m up to, follow me on instagram @lucyengelman

(Source: headduenorth)

—- i drew this super awesome bitters apothecary style witchcraft hippy brew image for a mag a few days ago that i’m super pumped about. hope you like it :)

—- i drew this super awesome bitters apothecary style witchcraft hippy brew image for a mag a few days ago that i’m super pumped about. hope you like it :)

Michiganders!If you could help a Illinois native out: My cousin (native to CA) and I are going to Rabbit Island later this month for a conservation residency and we need one very important thing….Michigan Field Guides! They will be returned unless donated. We’ll need them from July 22nd until the project is complete in October. Shoot me a message and I’ll be in touch. thanks friends! 

Michiganders!
If you could help a Illinois native out: 

My cousin (native to CA) and I are going to Rabbit Island later this month for a conservation residency and we need one very important thing….Michigan Field Guides! They will be returned unless donated. We’ll need them from July 22nd until the project is complete in October. Shoot me a message and I’ll be in touch. thanks friends!